visual communication
Typography 1

 

  syllabus :: project 1 :: project 2 :: project 3 :: project 4 :: Readings/Handouts :: Class Google Drive

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Professor: Andrea Herstowski
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: herstow@ku.edu

Professor: Alex Anderson
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: alexandersoncreative@gmail.com

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:: Links : start following...
:- Thinking with Type
:- Practical Typography
:- designobserver.com
:- friendsoftype.com
:- typographica.org
:- welovetypography.com

:- 25 Type Designers
:- 8 Faces
:- FontShop Spotlights
:- Fontshop Essays
:- I love Typography

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Project Three:

ZINE: Font Characteristics

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Create a 12 page informative zine which teaches someone about a specific typeface — you have been assigned.. Who designed it, when, its character, how to identify it... You will become the resident expert of your font.

Graphic design professionals are expected to recognize an almost infinite number of typefaces; it is essential, therefore, that students begin by learning the parts of the letter (terms), characteristics and to classify typefaces into these major historical, categories (type classifications): Old Style, Transitional, Modern, Slab Serif, Sans Serif.

During this project you will become the resident expert of a given font. You learn everything there is to know about that font including: its classification, characteristic details, who designed it, when it was designed,...And then visually teach what you know to us in a series of typographic posters.

Project Learning Objectives
_ understand the anatomy of letterforms
_ understand history of typography
_ understand type classifications
_ explore the expressive potential of typography
_ solve communication problems within given parameters
_ methodically document relevant design inspiration and process
_ present and assess work in a visually and verbally articulate manner
_ professionally document outcomes

Design Canon
25 Type Designers by Steven Heller
8 Faces series of interviews with Type and Lettering Artist
FontShop Spotlights series of interviews with Type Designers. Fontshop Essays
I love Typography: lots of great articles
: designing fonts

Resources: use them
Type Classifications / Thinking with Type
Designing Type by Karen Cheng: use this to guide you through looking at the details
Mac is not Typewitter (download pdf)
LetterFountain: Names and classifications : looking at construction
Glossary of Terms.pdf
Character Characteristic

The Final Artifacts/Deliverables
12 page Zine printed and stapled
Animated Gif
Behance post
Process Book

Zine: 10 x 8 inches (10 x 16 spread)
12pages = 6 spreads: includes front and back cover
Columns: 6 columns
Color: 2 colors + Black
Fonts: Your assigned font + secondary font

Contents of the Zine
_ Front and Back Cover
_ Font Characteristics: minimum 6 characteristics
_ Entire Character set: uppercase, lowercase, numbers and ! @ ? * & . ; ”
_ Bio about the Designer/Include other fonts they designed (list or show them)
_ History about the font/designer/classification 750 - 1000 words
_ History of the World or Wild Card spread**

*Somewhere in the Zine should be the basic information -- don't forget any of these: Your Name, Year, Font Name, Designer's Name, Designer's birth and death, Font Name, Font Classification, Definition of Classification, Date font was designed and at least 1 quote.

** you can use any content on the wild card spread -- anything about the font, person, typography...

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WEDNESDAY, Oct 3
** GO to the Hallmark Symposium on THURSDAY -- Don't skip it -- Go even if you are not enrolled. _ Font Draft
_ Arial vs Helvetica
_ Introduction to the project
_ Experimental Examples
_ Type Classifications / Thinking with Type
_ Make sure you have the font you have drafted and create the three pages to print for next class (see below)
_ Go to the KU Library! Go to Watson Library (that is where the typography books are housed)

_ Before you go to Watson ... Create three 11x17 b/w printouts: 1 sheet with all caps, 1 sheet of all lowercase, 1 sheet of punctuation and numbers. Make the characters as large as you can at least 72 point. Print them out for next class.

*On one of the 11x17 sheets include the following information about your font.
_ Sans Serif or Serif
_ Name of the Designer
_ Date it was designed
_ Classification
_ List its family members: Roman, Italic, Bold...(small caps)

HOMEWORK (it is a long list you need to do it all: Readings, Prep, Research...))
*Make sure you have your font installed on your computer!

PARTS OF THE LETTER BINGO next class be prepared
READ
: LetterFountain: Names and classifications (take notes)
READ: I love Typography: History | part 1 | part 2 | part 3 | part 4 | part 5 (take notes)
PRINT and READ: Glossary of Terms.pdf
BRING: a short ruler to class and a triangle, protractor… if you have it.

RESEARCH: YOUR FONT: everything you can find about your font and the designer. Start designing your process book all of this goes in it (design it as 8.5 x 11 landscape). Go online, Go to the KU Library!

History of the font/designer/classification. Research and write at least 1000 words about the origins of your font. Can be specifically about your font, or about the classification or both. Identify/find at least 3 quotes about your font, person, typography… https://typography.guru/quote/

History of the world. What was happening in the world the year/decade your font was designed, is it at all a reflection of the times? (no word min or max, not included in 1000 words or 500 words, is its own thing). Find 3 - 6 images from from Flickr Commons from that event, year, period...

Biography of your font designer: 500 words about the font designer. Include when and where they were born, died, list other fonts they designed

Bibliography: must included a bibliography, use at least 4 resources and only 2 of those can be online. That means you have to find a book, article.....include your bibliography in your process book

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MONDAY, October 8
_ Font Bingo (parts of the letter/glossary of terms)
_ History of Type Lecture
_ Overview: looking at construction
_ Designing with Type
Ex: https://www.behance.net/gallery/59687633/ITC-Lubalin-Graph

WORKING IN CLASS: Identify these characteristics you can about your font...
Baseline, Cap height, x-height, serif style, stroke width, apex, final/terminal, barb, spur, ear, loop, link, a and g one story or two story, tail, apex, leg

READ and use Designing with Type in class to help you identify and talk about the characteristics of your font

How can you teach us (the viewer) about your font. How can we tell your font apart from another? What is distinctive?

HOMEWORK
What are the key / distinguishing characteristics of your typeface? What are the most important characteristics that define your font? How are you going to teach them to us?

How would you verbally explain them?
How would VISUALLY explain them.

HINT: Diagram, scientific, technical, mechanical, compare, compare/contrast. These are rough quick ideas on on to convey the characteristics of your font In an interesting and informative way.

Explore 20 different ideas on how you can "diagrammatically" show us your fonts characteristics use 3 - 6 different characteristics. AT least 20 different ways to visually and verbally you have to use both verbal and visual. Verbal means you should have words describing what we are looking at. You are exploring the different ways you can dissect, examine, explain both visually and verbally.

Sketch by hand or use the computer (use InDesign not Illustrator). Design on a 8.5 x 11 landscape iYou can have 2 explorations per page.

If you did them on the computer PRINT in color (or b/w)

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WEDNESDAY, October 10
_ Present 20 ways to diagrammatically show your font's characteristics
_ Start Homework in class so you know what is expected of you. Complete at least 1 spread before you leave. We won’t meet again for a week so you need to make sure you know what is expected. You have homework over Fall Break do not wait until Sunday night to do it.

HOMEWORK (exploring layouts)
For homework you are designing 2 different spreads. One is about the Characteristics of your font. The other is how you can showcase the entire character set (upper case, lower case, numbers and key punctuation. Plus read Mac is Not a Typewriter. Start listening to Ted Talks — whatever topics interest you!

Zine: 10 x 8 inches
Columns: 6 columns
Fonts: Your assigned font + secondary font
Color: 2 colors + Black (remember you can flood a page with color)

_ Characteristics: Explore 7 different spread ideas. 7 Different Designs. Show how to diagrammatically show/explain at least 6 - 10 characteristics of your font. Use Scale, Contrast, Tension. (Can be the same characteristics, or you can try can be different ones.) A different way to teach us about your font. Think about composition, type sizes (remember you can use really small type for captions or identifiers), use contrast, scale, tension. Have fun and really push your designs. PRINT them out in color with crop marks on 11 x 17 sheet of paper. Each spread should be a different idea.

_ Explore 3 different ways to show the entire alphabet, punctuation, numbers on spread. How can you show off/identify the characteristics of your font?. On the spread include the font name and classification. Think about composition, type sizes (remember you can use really small type for captions or identifiers), use contrast, scale, tension. Have fun and really push your designs. PRINT them out in color with crop marks on 11 x 17 sheet of paper. Each spread should be a different idea.

REMEMBER: scale, color, size relationships, how to make it look "technical", mechanical, informational. Big's BIG smalls small. Smallest size can be 5pt. No limit on LARGE.

PRINT your 10 spreads on 11 x 17 in color with crop marks. Your designs are on 10 x 16 so we need to see where the page ends

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MONDAY, October 15 NO CLASS FALL BREAK
but you do have homework do not wait until Tuesday night to do it
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WEDNESDAY, October 17
_ Crit 10 Spreads
_ Lecture paragraph breaks
_ Justification/Hyphenation

HOMEWORK
Create on the computer at least 6 different design directions for the History of the font/designer/classification (750 - 1000 words) … try making all the text work on 1 spread, you may also try some versions where it goes onto 2 spreads. How do you get us to read about your font. Call outs? Quotes? Bold text? Leading shifts? You have to explore it. Show it. 6 different directions. Print them full size with crop marks AND print the grid in color or b/w.

Create 4 different Designer Bio spreads. Make sure you include the designers name, birth – death, other fonts they designed. Print them full size with crop marks AND print the grid in color or b/w.

Front and Back Cover: what have you done so far that could be cropped, over printed, translated into an interesting cover? You can use parts from any design or just design covers that look cool. Zine covers should be COOL :) Try at least 6 - 12 different cover ideas. You can print them small to fit onto 11 x 17 in color. The front and back will fit on an 11 x 17 with crop marks. If you want to save money you can print them smaller for this round.

REMEMBER: scale, color, size relationships, how to make it look "technical", mechanical, informational. Big's BIG smalls small. Smallest size can be 5pt. No limit on LARGE.

BRING all your spreads from last class also!!! don't leave them at home :)

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PARAGRAPH BREAKS
Paragraph breaks set a rhythm for the reader. The breaks have a relationship with the column of text as well as the page margins. A break may be introduced as an indentation, as a space or both. The over all page feel will be influenced by your choice.

In typography there are 4 rules regarding paragraph breaks:
1. first line at the beginning of an article should be flush left (do not indent first paragraph)
2. block paragraphs are flush left and are separated by extra leading not a full return
3. the amount indent is = to the leading (sometimes needs a bit more)
4. never hit two returns between paragraphs

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HYPHENATION RULES (Mac is not a Typewriter pages: 17, 18)

Don’t rely on the software to judge where hyphens should be placed. At the end of lines, leave at least two characters behind and take at least three forward. For example, “ele-gantly” is acceptable, but “elegant-ly” is not because it takes too little of the word to the next line. Avoid leaving the stub end of a hyphenated word or any word shorter then four letters as the last line of a paragraph.

Avoid more then 3 consecutive hyphenated lines. Avoid hyphenating or breaking proper names and titles. Creating a non-breaking space before and after the name will ensure that the name will not break. Avoid beginning three consecutive lines with the same word
Since software programs deal with line breaks automatically based upon a number of variables, it is possible to have paragraphs with consecutive lines beginning with the same word. When this happens simply adjust the text to avoid/fix the problem.

Hyphenation Rules
-- how the text is read avoid widows (one word on the last line of a paragraph)
-- avoid hyphenating or line brakes of names and proper nouns
-- leave a least 2 characters on the line and 3 following
-- avoid beginning consecutive lines with the same word
-- avoid ending consecutive lines with the same word
-- avoid ending lines with the words: the, of, at, a, by..
-- never hyphenate a words in a headline and avoid hyphenation in a callout

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JUSTIFICATION (Mac is not a Typewriter pages: 15- 24)

Justify text only if the line is long enough to prevent awkward and inconsistent word spacing. The only time you can safely justify text is if your type is small enough and your line is long enough, as in books where the text goes all the way across the page. If your line is shorter, as in newsletter, or if you don't have many words on the line, than as the type aligns to the margins the words space themselves to accommodate it. It usually looks awkward. You've seen newspaper columns where all text is justified, often with a word stretching all the way across the column, or a little word on either side of the column with a big gap in the middle. Gross. But that's what can happen with justified type. When you do it, the effect might not be as radical as the newspaper column, but if your lines are relatively short, you will inevitably end up with uncomfortable gaps in some lines, while other lines will be all squished together.

When your work comes out of the printer, turn it upside down and squint at it. The rivers will be very easy to spot. Get rid of them. Try squinting at the example on the bottom of the previous page.

Rivers
In typography, rivers, or rivers of white, are visually unattractive gaps appearing to run down a paragraph of text. They can occur with any spacing, though they are most noticeable with wide word spaces caused by either full text justification or monospaced fonts.

Widows and Orphans
Never leave widows and orphans bereft on the page. Avoid both of these situations. If you have editing privileges, rewrite the copy, or at least add or delete a word or two. Sometimes you can remove spacing from the letters, words, or lines, depending on which program you’re working in. Sometimes widening a margin just a hair will do it. But it must be done. Widows and orphans on a page are wrong.

Widow
When a paragraph ends and leaves fewer than seven characters (not words, characters) on the last line, that line is called a widow. Worse than leaving one word at the end of a line is leaving part of a word, the other part being paraphrased on the line above.

Orphan
When the last line of a paragraph, be it ever so long, won’t fit at the bottom of a column and must end itself at the top of the next column, that is an orphan. ALWAYS correct this.

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MONDAY, October 22
_ crit spreads, type size, column width, word spacing, justification,
_ create paragraph styles
_ create character styles
_ bring in all the spreads you have done so far
_ start planing the Zine 12 or 16 pages (including cover)

HOMEWORK
Taking from what you have done so far put TWO ZINEs togehter and refine them in InDesign how do you make them more coheisive? How can they more surprise? Pacing? Scale? Tension. WORK on the type pages many were ROUGH. 12 or 16 pages. Including the font and back cover. What goes together. How what do you need to add/refine to really teach us the characteristics of your font? How can you create more scale? Surprise? How will the Zine flow?

Bring in both ZINES (printed, trim, folded), NOT STAPLED.

If your covers weren't good then design some extra covers. If you spreads with History spreads were not good design some extra spreads. If you your characteristics spreads are not good make some extra. You get idea. Get your Zines as cool and great and fun as possible so you have a week to make them awesome.

Contents of the Zine (can be in any order)
_ Front and Back Cover
_ Font Characteristics: minimum 6 characteristics
_ Entire Character set: uppercase, lowercase, numbers and ! @ ? * & . ; ”
_ Bio about the Designer/Include other fonts they designed (list or show them)
_ History about the font/designer/classification 750 - 1000 words
_ History of the World or Wild Card spread**

*Somewhere in the Zine should be the basic information -- don't forget any of these: Your Name, Year, Font Name, Designer's Name, Designer's birth and death, Font Name, Font Classification, Definition of Classification, Date font was designed and at least 1 quote.

** you can use any content on the wild card spread -- anything about the font, person, typography...

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WEDNESDAY, October 24
_ Using the Grid
_ Consistancey in form and typography
_ Visual toolkit
_ Write better headlines (title, titles for text heavy spreads)

HOMEWORK
_ Design/Refine your entire Zine
_ Create one Zine but with two variations/options of spreads in the Zine
* exploring how to make some spreads stronger, pacing, scale, tension
_ How can you use the grid consistantly, horizontal alignment througout, consistant type sizes.
_ How can you have dense pages followed by visual break...
_ Write better headlines: What is your Zine Called? Title can you give the History Section? The Bio
*don't call it BIO or Biography ... write something else
_ Use Mac is not a Typewriter as a guide to make all your typography correct: follow the rules in the book
_ Storyboard/ start your Animated Gif / Animation (photoshop or aftereffects)
*at least your the font name and 1 characteristic
_ Start getting your process book together: maybe GroupMe an outline (you all create it

Print, trim and fold it for Monday...

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MONDAY, October 29
Use Mac is not a Typewriter
Attention to details. Space between periods. Quotes. En Dash. Em Dash. Leading. Word Spacing. Kerning. Alignments through spreads. Consistent use of the grid. Consistency of type sizes (use character styles to make sure everything is correct). This is your last push to make it all better and as perfect as you can.

HOMEWORK
Refine it still figure out how to make it better!
all and Produce it. Zine + Behance

_Simple mock-up (NEW download it) in Photoshop. Export your spreads as PNG files, Spreads, High Res... Directions and example of 1 spread are here

_Sending to Jayhawk read directions. Saddle Stiched. Print on 24# or 32# or your own paper (bring it trimmed to 11 x 17). Single page pdf. First page is front cover, last page is the back cover. Bleed your colors. Trim and fold to 10 x 8. Saddle Stich. Remember you pdf shoudl be 12 pages or 16 pages total. Send your files via www.jayhawkinkpod.com

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WEDNESDAY, OCT 31
_ 1 copy of your zine
_ Process book as a pdf OR printed out (all of your process, notes, research....)
_ pdf of your Zine as spreads. Grid tunred on.
Put your pdf(s) in this folder on the Google drive and into either Alex or Andrea

Posted on your behance.net page (directions on how to get a sharp image are here)
_ project description
_ 1 animated gif (at least your the font name and 1 characteristic)
_ All the spreads (simple mock up is fine)