visual communication
VISC 302

 

  :: syllabus :: banned book list
:: p1: workbook :: p2 logotype :: p3: bookcovers :: p4: conference ::

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Professor: Andrea Herstowski
Office: 317 Marvin Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: herstow@ku.edu

Professor: Alex Anderson
Office: 353 Marvin Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: alexandersoncreative@gmail.com

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:: Research
:- Thinking with Type
:- Typotheque
:- Type Cultur
:- Visual Thesaurus
:- Type Base
:- dailydropcap.com
:- designobserver.com
:- formfiftyfive.com
:- friendsoftype.com
:- ministryoftype.co.uk
:- typographica.org
:- welovetypography.com

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:: Short films :: Audio
:- films by Hillman Curtis
:- Type Radio

 


 

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Project One: Typographic Workbook

The type workbook is a series of investigations you will be conducting. The content ranges from typographic studies to type setting rules in typography. It is a time intensive project that requires a lot of attention to details. The workbook should hold together as one document. There are different types of information you will be "displaying" As design professionals it will be apparent if you know the rules or if you don’t. When a professional looks at your type, they can immediately tell if you "know" type. Getting and keeping the job you want requires that you know and master these rules/terms. The upper-level classes focus on the macro of typography, the big idea... this workbook focuses on the micro (all the typographic details) it is expected that you know this information and it will not be covered again.

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Intense Attention to Detail

To design professionals it will be apparent if you “know” type or if you don’t. When a good professional looks at your type, they can immediately tell. Getting and keeping the job you want, whether in traditional or digital design, requires that you know and master typographic rules, terms and application. Upper-level classes focus on the macro of typography, the big idea... this workbook focuses on the micro (all the typographic details). It is expected that you learn this information as it will not be covered again. You are creating your own typographic resource that you can reference again and again. Take care, invest the time needed, and pay attention to every detail.

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Rules, Hierarchy and Pacing

The project is all about the rules and details of typography, using them to design your book and presenting them within the book content. Another important component is pacing: applying hierarchy through scale, contrast, position and arrangement to invite the reader into the page. The investigations themselves are basic but how you apply all you learn through them will give you the tools to attain a sophisticated command of arranging complex information in elegant and understandable ways. You will use the learnings to highlight important content and treat title and chapter pages, running headers, captions and folios. Your use of typeface, type size and weight and your use of color is what will make the book beautiful, elegant and dynamic (or not). This is not an easy project, it is complex.

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Books
Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton (read this over)
Mac is Not a Typewriter (pdf) (read this over)
The Elements of Typographic Style
: Robert Bringhurst
Getting it Right with Type: Victoria Squire
Typographic Systems: Kimberly Elam
Letter Fountain. book and online

Read
Read the InDesign How to Document (pdf)
Read Mac is Not a Typewriter (pdf)

Watch: if you are not comfortable with InDesign you should watch Lynda.com. I suggest the ones by Nigel French.

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Rules & Restrictions goals:
successfully design and typeset both a printed book about the principles of typography
tools: Adobe InDesign
size print: 8.25” x 10.75”
page count: unlimited so do not overcrowd pages fonts: typefaces of your choice,
determined by investigation
color: full color
grid: 6 column
output: final output will be digitally printed with Lulu.com

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Baseline Grid (also called the leading grid)
Many people call the baseline grid, the leading grid. It maybe easier to understand the baseline grid thinking about it as the leading grid. The key is the baseline grid is based on leading. The leading should be related (a multiple) of the baseline grid.

*Make sure you use a baseline grid for your workbook. Change the baseline grid to what makes sense for your design. (hint a multiple of 3 or 4). Watch Video.

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Paragraph and Character Styles
To keep your text consistant in the entire book you should use Paragraph Styles and Character Styles. If you need to make changes to the font, size, leading, color, style you can change them all globally through Styles.

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Wed. January 17
Syllabus
Homework overview: make sure you understand what you need to do before you tune out!
Google Drive link
VisCom Fonts (MAC only)

HOMEWORK
Workbook Exercises
Use the links to get to the instructions for each assignment. Complete them all. Save the files as pdf and upload the pdfs to the Google Drive folder, The Tab It exercise you must hand in as an InDesign file.
-- Famous First Page
-- Typographic Color
-- The End of the River
-- Tab it

Research
you have been assigned a movement (just one) in the history of art or design. You need to research the movement throughly and present it on 2 - 3 11 x 17 pages. Print them out for class
__ Name of the Movement
__ Overview: who what when and where
__ Dates
__ Key Figures (key players)
__ Show examples of the movement (this is type class and you are graphic designers so think about what examples you are showing! example: DADA not this one, Futurism not this one)

Start with the provided link but you have to dig deeper.
Bauhaus (new typography)
European Influencers
The Early Broadside (early advertising)
Constructivism
Deconstructivism (Crandbrook typography)
Dada
DeStijl
Futurism
The New York School
New Wave
Swiss International Style

*if you hate the movement you were assigned you still have to research it but you could IN ADDITION research one that you find more interesting. do the work

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Monday Jan 22
Using the research you completed about the movement create a tool kit for the movement.

What are the essential elements of the movement?

Working in class: The tool kit is the kit of parts someone would need to recreate a visual that would look like the movement. It should include visual elements, color palette, suggested font list and any directions. You have 1.5 hours to make your tool kit in class. Print it out. Put it on the Google drive. Name it = Movement_yourname.pdf).

HOMEWORK
What is the visual concept for your Workbook? What are you going to call it? Come up with at least 10 ideas then pick 2 and develop concepts. The can be anything. You may use found imagery, illustrations... Create a Tool Kit for each concept (2 tool kits). (visual elements, color palette, font list...) You can use your movement tool kit or pull a classmates tool kit off the google drive. Yep you are sharing your tool kits.

Once you have your concepts and tool kits explore what a chapter opening will look like.
At least 10 different chapter openings EXPLORATIONS total.

Make sure you are working in the correct size 8.25 x 10.75 page (2 pages = spread)

TEXT: (use all of the text or just a portion of it for your spreads)

TIP: try some with just some of the text. Try some with all of the text. THIS is your time to explore the look and feel of your workbook. Wednesday you pick the visual direction and then you GO!

Print your tool kits and spread on 11 x 17 and bring them to class.

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TEXT

Chapter 14: Typographic Color
When typographers mention to color, they are typically not referring to a rainbow. They are speaking, instead, of black and white and the wide range of gray textures which are called forth when white and black interact. Every typeface has its own apparent lightness or darkness, or optical weight. A typeface’s color is determined by stroke width, x-height, character width and serif styles.

As the great Swiss typographer Emil Ruder* put it in 1960, “The business of typography is a continual weighing up of white and black, which requires a thorough knowledge of the laws governing optical values.

*Emil Ruder was a typographer and graphic designer who, born in Switzerland in 1914, helped Armin Hofmann form the Basel School of Design and establish the style of design known as Swiss Design. He taught that, above all, typography's purpose was to communicate ideas through writing. He placed a heavy importance on sans-serif typefaces and his work is both clear and concise, especially his typography.
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TIMELINE

To keep it would be a good idea to on chapters the entire class period/homework. The Chapters listed under each day we will review the content in class and then you can designe that chapter. Feel free to work a head. Please save your work often. Have a pdf of where you are for class feedback. Use a baseline grid. Use paragraph styles and character styles. Make sure you are using the correct document size 8.25” x 10.75”, Use a grid for everything! Every page has to use a grid. You have until February 7 to complete this project. Black and white perfect bound print out from Jayhawk Ink is due February 7.

Use this WORD DOC for the CONTENTin the workbook. All the content has to be in the workbook but if you want to put in a different order you may.

Monday January 22: Concept Development

January 24, Wednesday
master pages (page numbers, running heads)
understanding baseline grid (InDesign Doc)
understanding paragraph and character styles (download worksheet)
To keep your text consistant in the entire book you should use Paragraph Styles and Character Styles. If you need to make changes to the font, size, leading, color, style you can change them all globally through Styles.

InClass and Homework
Design at least the first 4 chapters: 1 Rules Checksheet, 2 Typographic Rules, 3 Special Characters, 4 Hyphens and Dashes) Drop them in Google Drive so we can crit them in class. You need to have your look and feel figured out by Monday if you still are working on what this workbook will look like you will be really behind. Make sure you set your character styles. Finishing the workbook will be faster and more consistent if you use the Character Styles.

January 29, Monday
InClass and Homework
5 Quotes and Apostrophe, 6 Numerals, 7 Small Caps, 8 Tabular Matter, 9 Alignments,

January 31, Wednesday
InClass and Homework
10 Hyphenation Etiquette, 11 Line Length, 12 The End Of The River, 13 Type Classifications,

February 5, Monday
14 Typographic Color, 15 Tschichold Grid, 16 Paragraph Breaks

Print out letters (you can use this to start) and the grids.

Dallas Competition:
sophomore portfolio, workbook, icons, packaging
National Student Show (Dallas) info

Print out your letters it at least 30 fonts/styles at 100pts tall. Try all caps, all lowercase, reg, bold, light, condensed, extended, italic…you need the variety to make 50! label the fonts so you know what you are working with. You need this to sketch from and you may print the letters out a different sizes but be logical: ex. 50pt and 100pt.

Print out the grid here it is! (or make your own)

Due Monday February 12
*remember Jayhawk Ink isn't open on Sunday

B/W perfect bound at Jayhawk Inc.
Put Packaged File in your Google Drive Folder (Indesign File + pdf + fonts + images)

Grading -- all about the type!
Character Styles (-10pts if not used)
Everything locked to the baseline grid (-10pt if you didn't lock to the baseline)
6 column grid (or created own grid) (-10pts if you are not using the grid correctly)
Visual Narrative: pacing, surprise, scale, tension…(-10pts if your book is static)
Every spread has at least 3 levels of hierarchy within the content (-10pts if you don't)
Running heads and Page Numbers (folios) (-5 if they are not integrated into the page)
Clear hierarchy (-5 if your heirarchy isn't clear)
Type Size is appropriate to the page and to the content. (-5 if too big or too small)
Making the content yours by callouts, examples… (-5 if you didn't find ways)
Examples are correct (-5pts if your examples are not correct)
Corrected justification (if used) (-5 pts for bad justification)
Followed Hyphenation Rules (all of them) (-5pts if you hyphenated where you shouldn't)
Widows or Orphans (-5pts for widows or orphans)