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:: FINAL DELIVERABLES :: REFINE/EXPAND :: PERSONAL BRANDING :: REDO :: BRANDING :: WEBSITE :: PORTFOLIO
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:: Calendar :: Google Drive :: Assessment :: Research :: Blurbs :: Coverletters :: Getting a Job :: Salary :: LinkedIn Tips



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Professor: Andrea Herstowski
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: herstow@ku.edu

Professor: Alex Anderson
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: alexandersoncreative@gmail.com

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Flaunt by UnderConsideration
Building Portfolios
Letterhead and Logo Design
Handbook of Pricing & Ethical Guideline

Presenting | AIGA ARTICLE |
Writing your resume | AIGA ARTICLE |
Top Mistakes | AIGA ARTICLE |

:- Word to the unwise
:- Top 10 Cover letter Tips
:- Cover letters get you hired
:- 6 ways to bomb an interview
:- 3 steps successful interview
:- my-fill-in-the-blank-career

How to be a graphic designer without losing your Soul
:- introduction
:- Chapter 1: Attributes
:- Chapter 2: How to Find a Job
:- Chapter 8: Self Promotion

:- Chapter 9: Creative Process

 

 


 

 

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VISC 530: Coverletters and Emails

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:: Claire's Tips
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AIGA Article: Be mindful of the order in which the potential employer will be receiving your information. It’ll likely be email first, then the portfolio link second, then the resume attachment third. Unless you’ve met the person you’re emailing, your email or cover letter will be the first impression, so keep relevance and context in mind.

That means a succinct and appealing subject line. Put yourself in their shoes. What would get you to open an email if you were a creative director?

Then there’s email itself. Don’t ramble on with your life story. They are short on time and may click off your email altogether if it’s too overwhelming to read. Keep the email short and direct but tailored to them. Express how you found them or their work, why it really resonates with you, and why that made you want to write to them. Briefly introduce yourself and ask for advice. Don’t ask for a job. Attach your resume or LinkedIn profile (which is often just as good, if not better) and include a link to your online portfolio.

Make your call to action clear. Invite them for coffee or a quick 15–20 minute chat at a time that suits them. Let them know how grateful you are and how much of a privilege it’d be to receive their constructive feedback and advice.

The key is to build rapport first. Aim to build a connection. There is, of course, more to it than that when it comes to increasing your chances of getting an interview, but that’s where to start.

Aside from first impressions via email (i.e. what you write and how you say it), your work must also be of a high standard. It should leave them thinking, “I’d regret not meeting this person. They have interesting ideas, beautiful craftsmanship,
and potential.” How can you make that reaction happen? You have to create work that they need and cater to who you’re communicating with as well. If a digital agency is after UX and UI designers, but you’re only showing print work
and packaging, it’s unlikely you’ll get a response.

The other part of this entire equation is to network and meet people constantly, both online and offline. You can really accelerate your chances of getting an interview by hunting away from the herd.

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If you’re applying by email, the email is the cover letter. This should be as short as possible, but specific to the recipient beyond just changing the name. Include the job title and where you saw the listing, as well as a statement about who you
are and what you’re currently doing. Tell the recipient why the work of the studio or company interests you, and what you would expect from the experience. Then tell them about your experience and skills and how they can see them in the
link that you’ve provided. End with your signature, link to your website (behance is fine) and attach your resume.

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The first cover letters are really difficult. Get some feedback on your first ones before you send them.

Introductory paragraph
Identify yourself, except please don't start off as "my name is and I go to KU". Start off strong, interesting... You can say you are a young designer but you don’t need to say I am graduating in May. They will see all this on your resume, so be creative. Something about yourself / how do you know of the company/ did someone tell you about them / refer you to them /see a job listing / did you see them speak /see them in an article online / in a magazine / state your objective (to get a job or internship, etc.) ...

Next Paragraph
Something about them – be specific – a project you found interesting, a quote from the website... and why it speaks to you. Does it relate to anything you have done or would like to do.

Next
Don’t reiterate your resume. Make a stronger impression by limiting your focus to one or two experiences/projects. If you talk about a project and how it relates to them then they are likely to click on your link and look at the project (hook them into your portfolio). The more specific you can be, the better. * the project(s)/ experience you choose should change based on what the company you are applying to: if they are branding choose a banding project and maybe a project with a lot or research or a lot of text....

Conclusion:
In the final paragraph, restate your interest in the company and take an active roll say “I will contact you in next week to see if there is a time we can meet...”and then you have to CALL. Do not expect anyone to call you. You must call and
follow up with them.

Sincerely,
Your Name
website address
attach resume

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TIPS
__ be formal
__ address it Dear Mr or Ms First Name Last Name (get it correct)
__ avoid being generic, do not write "your company" name the company
__ be specific 1 – 2 things about the company or the work they have done.
__ be specific about a project or experience you have
__ do not be assuming “I know I have the qualifications, qualify me for the position...” Don't tell them you are qualified
__ in the letter: do no list phone number or say this is how you can reach me. Contact them.
__ DO NOT list software you know in the letter
__ NO typos whatsoever

Online Resources:
a-word-to-the-unwise
what-makes-a-great-cover-letter-according-to-companies
how-do-you-make-a-good-first-impression-via-email