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:: FINAL DELIVERABLES :: REFINE/EXPAND :: PERSONAL BRANDING :: REDO :: BRANDING :: WEBSITE :: PORTFOLIO
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:: Calendar :: Google Drive :: Assessment :: Research :: Blurbs :: Coverletters :: Getting a Job :: Salary :: LinkedIn Tips



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Professor: Andrea Herstowski
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: herstow@ku.edu

Professor: Alex Anderson
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: alexandersoncreative@gmail.com

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Flaunt by UnderConsideration
Building Portfolios
Letterhead and Logo Design
Handbook of Pricing & Ethical Guideline

Presenting | AIGA ARTICLE |
Writing your resume | AIGA ARTICLE |
Top Mistakes | AIGA ARTICLE |

:- Word to the unwise
:- Top 10 Cover letter Tips
:- Cover letters get you hired
:- 6 ways to bomb an interview
:- 3 steps successful interview
:- my-fill-in-the-blank-career

How to be a graphic designer without losing your Soul
:- introduction
:- Chapter 1: Attributes
:- Chapter 2: How to Find a Job
:- Chapter 8: Self Promotion

:- Chapter 9: Creative Process

 

 


 

 

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VISC 530: Getting a Job
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:: Application Process :: The Interview :: Accepting the Job
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Before you apply
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Clean up your FB page, remove tags
__ Start using your Instagram to promote your good style, sense and interests. (make a prof instagram)
__ Twitter page brand it to match your personal branding,use it to follow, retweet...to a job

Maintain an on-line portfolio. This can be on any platform, or use any service, and its form can even be somewhat generic. The most important thing is to make it easy for a potential employer to get a sense of your work in 10 seconds, and proof of what you can do in five minutes.

Have a greater-than-zero web presence. When your name crosses the desktop of your dream employer, the first thing they’re going to do is look you up on-line. If you haven’t already, search for yourself. What shows up? If the answer is nothing, and another candidate is habitually sharing thoughtful and relevant links and images, they’re suddenly a more attractive option, and all before the employer has even read your painstakingly created resume.

Practice talking to people about what you do. Meeting strangers one-on-one can be daunting. The more you practice, the better you’ll get at it. While you’re in school, visit other faculty on campus or professionals off-campus to discuss your
projects. Ask for informational interviews. Pay attention. What are some of the questions people ask? How long can you talk before someone’s attention flags?

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The application process

Read the job description. Is it clearly written and realistic? Does it sound like the company or department shares your values? If so, do you have the skills and experience listed under the qualifications? Do you know what you’ll show to
demonstrate that you fit those qualifications? Finally, do you meet the non-design qualifications, such as immigration or visa status?

Read the instructions. This is a test. If the listing says to send a cover letter, resume, and portfolio link to an email address, do exactly that. There’s someone at the other end who’s managing this process, and who’ll appreciate your effort to make their job easier. If there’s an online application, use it and follow the instructions. When they meet to assess candidates, they’ll be looking at the list it generates, and if you’re not on that list, you won’t be considered. No random email or care package you’ve sent along will change that.

PDF portfolio. Only send/attach a pdf portfolio If they’ve asked for one, and watch the size. Do not attach any pdf that is over 10MB. PDF portfolio demonstrates that you have the skills and qualifications asked for in the job description. This should be specifically tailored to the company with a maximum of five projects, while your website can appeal to a broader number of people and demonstrate a wider range of skills.

Wait. Unless they need someone tomorrow, companies will wait until they have around five applications in hand before responding or scheduling interviews. If multiple people are reviewing the candidates, it may take even longer to find
a time when they’re all available. You should follow up no more than twice by email (a week later and a month later) to ask where they are in the process, but only if you already have direct access to someone and you’re still interested. The
bigger the company, the more likely it is that you won’t get a response unless it’s a definite yes.