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:: FINAL DELIVERABLES :: REFINE/EXPAND :: PERSONAL BRANDING :: REDO :: BRANDING :: WEBSITE :: PORTFOLIO
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:: Calendar :: Google Drive :: Assessment :: Research :: Blurbs :: Coverletters :: Getting a Job :: Salary :: LinkedIn Tips



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Professor: Andrea Herstowski
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: herstow@ku.edu

Professor: Alex Anderson
Office: 353 Chalmers Hall
Office hours: by appointment
email: alexandersoncreative@gmail.com

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Flaunt by UnderConsideration
Building Portfolios
Letterhead and Logo Design
Handbook of Pricing & Ethical Guideline

Presenting | AIGA ARTICLE |
Writing your resume | AIGA ARTICLE |
Top Mistakes | AIGA ARTICLE |

:- Word to the unwise
:- Top 10 Cover letter Tips
:- Cover letters get you hired
:- 6 ways to bomb an interview
:- 3 steps successful interview
:- my-fill-in-the-blank-career

How to be a graphic designer without losing your Soul
:- introduction
:- Chapter 1: Attributes
:- Chapter 2: How to Find a Job
:- Chapter 8: Self Promotion

:- Chapter 9: Creative Process

 

 


 

 

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VISC 530: Getting a Job:
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:: Application Process :: The Interview :: Accepting the Job
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Before and during the interview

READ: six-ways-to-bomb-an-interview
READ: three-steps-to-a-successful-job-interview

Be courteous over email. Most companies expect employees to be good communicators both via email and in person. If someone asks you about setting up a meeting, be specific about when you’re available. If they suggest a time or a
range of times, confirm what’s best for you and what you can do if that time is no longer available. If you can’t make it then, suggest three times (or time spans) in the future when you’re available. Ask if they’d like you to prepare anything before meeting.

Ask who you will be meeting with. Number of people is important to know so you can adjust your presentation small group vs large group. Multiple meetings. Do your research.

Anticipate questions. The night before the interview, write down five questions you think you may be asked and answer them. Don’t bring these notes with you— this is just to help you prepare. Never say anything bad about anyone. Ever. Design world is very small.

Be on time. Before you leave know where you are going. Give yourself some extra time. Do not be late. But also don't be too early. Small firms don't know what to do with you if you are too early.

If you’re offered a glass of water, accept it. Generosity offered and accepted puts the giver at ease. Once you’re calm, focus on how your interviewer is feeling. *Sometimes interviews are over lunch or run into happy hour. Remember you are still on an interview. Be professional.

Relax. All the interviewer wants is for you to be the one. They’re rooting for you. You are there because they have seen your work online and they liked your work.

Let the interviewer lead. If you’re showing work, ask if they’d like you to move through it, or if they’d prefer to “drive.” If you’re showing work digitally, show it on a tablet if you can, rather than a laptop.

Ask questions. Whether or not you can do a job is usually answered by your resume and your portfolio. The interview is about whether or not you want the job and whether or not you’ll fit into the company’s culture. Having no questions
about the company may signal that you don’t really care whether you work there or not, especially if there’s already been media coverage about their projects or operations.

Have a list of questions to ask them -- even if they answered a lot of them.
Keep a long list and then pick a few to ask.
_ What is a typical day like in the studio
_ How many projects are you currently working on
_ What has been your favorite project or Is your favorite thing about working here
_ Who will I be working with or Who will be answering to
_ if you are bold: what do you see in my portfolio that makes me not qualified for the job
_ where have junior designers failed in the past
_ What is your advice for success....

* Make your own list of questions you feel comfortable asking. Do your research first!
* At the first meeting do not ask about pay, vacation, benefits, family, politics...

Follow up with a thank you. Do this the next day at the latest. Thank them for their time. Say something specific about the interview....

Be courteous, brief, name everyone you met with, and say something that shows that you appreciated the meeting. Even if you’re no longer interested, or it was clear from the meeting that you’re not what the company is looking for, you want the individuals you met to remember you for your courtesy and professionalism when they move on to other companies.

Wait. Again, it’s customary to follow up twice over email and ask where they are in the process if you don’t hear back, but no more. If they reply by saying they’ve hired someone else, respond with courtesy. Leaving a good impression is a very
small gesture that can lead to greater returns in the future.